Ten out of Ten

Every day, new first-time founders stumble on a great new idea and embark into the world of entrepreneurship, hoping to change the world.

And every day, you serve these founders in accelerators, incubators, coworking spaces, universities, angel groups, and community or economic development organizations. You are on the front lines of offering direct support and guidance to founders.

At Fluent, we are obsessed with pushing the state of the industry forward, specifically for community-based entrepreneurial support organizations.

In Ten out of Ten, Fluent CEO Beth McKeon outlines her vision for how startup community leaders can move beyond optimizing for luck in our ecosystems to a model designed to produce predictable, repeatable startup success.

 Available for purchase: Spring 2019

Ten out of Ten

Every day, new first-time founders stumble on a great new idea and embark into the world of entrepreneurship, hoping to change the world.

And every day, you serve your these founders in accelerators, incubators, coworking spaces, universities, angel groups, and community or economic development organizations. You are on the front lines of offering direct support and guidance to founders.

At Fluent, we are obsessed with pushing the state of the industry forward, specifically for community-based entrepreneurial support organizations.

In Ten out of Ten, Fluent CEO Beth McKeon outlines her vision for how startup community leaders can move beyond optimizing for luck in our ecosystems to a model designed to produce predictable, repeatable startup success.

 

Available for purchase: Spring 2019

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Building startups is risky business. And those of us in the trenches of supporting startup development in our communities have made a big mistake. We’ve conflated risk and luck.

From Ten out of Ten, by Beth McKeon

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Click to read more...

From the introduction:

Building startups is risky business.  And those of us in the trenches of supporting startup development in our communities have made a big mistake. We’ve conflated risk and luck.

For the past ten years, our communities have been testing a set of theories about how to best support startup activity – from events like Startup Weekend, to coworking spaces, to programs like accelerators. These programs and services all have one thing in common: they are all engineered to increase a startup’s opportunities for luck and serendipity. Almost no thought has been put into designing systems that predictably, repeatably create startup success.

We’ve optimized our spaces to increase collisions. We’ve measured our success, not with data, but with the number of mentors on our program roster. We’ve operated with the belief that our role as ecosystem builders is to convene the right mix of people, that in the gathering of smart, committed people magic will happen.

(And sometimes it does. Such is the way of magic and luck.)

But luck is what it looks like when you don’t know how to measure, experiment, and optimize to get the results you want. We’ve optimized for luck long enough.

~~~~~

Download the free chapter to continue reading

Click to read more...

From the introduction:

Building startups is risky business.  And those of us in the trenches of supporting startup development in our communities have made a big mistake. We’ve conflated risk and luck.

For the past ten years, our communities have been testing a set of theories about how to best support startup activity – from events like Startup Weekend, to coworking spaces, to programs like accelerators. These programs and services all have one thing in common: they are all engineered to increase a startup’s opportunities for luck and serendipity. Almost no thought has been put into designing systems that predictably, repeatably create startup success.

We’ve optimized our spaces to increase collisions. We’ve measured our success, not with data, but with the number of mentors on our program roster. We’ve operated with the belief that our role as ecosystem builders is to convene the right mix of people, that in the gathering of smart, committed people magic will happen.

(And sometimes it does. Such is the way of magic and luck.)

But luck is what it looks like when you don’t know how to measure, experiment, and optimize to get the results you want. We’ve optimized for luck long enough.

~~~~~

Download the free chapter to continue reading

Ten out of Ten

Part One

“One Size Fits All” Fits No One
Your Mentors Aren’t All That
Stop Pitching Already
Measuring What Matters

Part Two

Introduction to the Fluent Founder Roadmap
Applying the Founder Roadmap
Introduction to the Fluency Score
We Should Operate Like Startups

About the author

Beth McKeon is an entrepreneur and educator. After serving as Managing Director of NMotion, a GAN accelerator in Lincoln NE, she founded Fluent to expand her work with founder education and startup ecosystem building nationwide. In 2018, she worked over 100 founders, consulting with and managing accelerators in four states.

Prior to her work with accelerators, Beth founded Kids Calendar, a startup serving local families in five cities across the US, which she sold in 2017.

Before finding her calling in the startup world, Beth spent 12 years as an educator and professional development coach in the private and public sector. She received her Master’s degree from Columbia University in 2005.